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Frank Fairfield - Daytrotter Session download mp3 album

Frank Fairfield - Daytrotter Session download mp3 album
Performer:
Frank Fairfield
Album:
Daytrotter Session
Style:
Bluegrass
Released:
2010
FLAC vers. size:
1700 mb
MP3 vers. size:
1721 mb
WMA vers. size:
1481 mb
Other formats
VOX MP1 APE WAV DMF ADX MMF
Rating:
4.2 ★
Votes:
852

Frank Fairfield is hard to speak to. He is consumed with a feeling that most of us cannot speak to. We cannot get to it for we can only imagine a very loose-fitting replication of that place where he lives. His self-titled album from last year is a gritty and rough take on the pride and tiredness of a good and faithful, god-fearing man and the pains of living. These are simple, but unbelievably true to the grain ballads of lesser times, but of more wholesome times, when things were cleaner, harder and in many ways more appealing because of it.

Jan 26, 2012 Studio Paradiso, San Francisco, CA. For the best audio experience, download the free Paste Music & Daytrotter app. Welcome to Daytrotter00:03. Polka Mazurka Medley05:58. Words by Sean Moeller, Illustration by Johnnie Cluney, Recording engineered by Shawn Biggs. Death sure hangs around Frank Fairfield. It's an old man's concern. It's what we get to when the sight is dimming and after all that hair that we once had has thinned itself completely away, off on the breezes.

Artist: Frank Turner. Album: Daytrotter Session Big Orange Studios November 17th, 2011. Previously on NewAlbumReleases. net: January 31, 2019 - Frank Turner – Don’t Worry (2019). May 13, 2018 - Frank Turner – Be More Kind (2018). November 24, 2017 - Frank Turner – Songbook (2017).

Indie Rock Deerhunter. Band Name Deerhunter. Album Name Daytrotter Session. Type EP. Released date 19 November 2007. Music StyleIndie Rock. Members owning this album0.

Frank Fairfield Frank Fairfield plays down-home, old time folk music. He plays fiddle, guitar, banjo and he sings. Born in Fresno, California, he now lives in Los Angeles with his wife. A and Canada bookings contact: ing. For North American Festivals: Steve Fugett, roadwarrioragencyl. com Out On The Open West, released 30 May 2011 1. Poor Old Lance 2. Texas Farewell. Frank Fairfield plays down-home, old time folk music. He plays fiddle, guitar, banjo and he sings lives in Los Angeles with his wife.

Banjo, fiddle and guitar music. Frank Fairfield added an event.

The album is a pure guitar/drum adrenalin rush – plenty of fuzz, tremolo, riffs, chunky chords, slide and Black Sabbath power chords. The songs are tight and lean; no fat. Recorded both at Brooklyn’s Bunker Studio as well as at Crushed Out’s own analog studio in a rural New Hampshire barn, the tracks were all self-produced and mixed by John Davis. Standout tracks include Black & Purple, a true song about Frank’s mother getting dressed down for listening to a Black Sabbath record when she was a teenager; the vocals manage to reference Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers (as well as the Ravonettes, who have a similar musical aesthetic). Temper Tantrum is an explosive rocker dealing with anger and its effects. Adults can be more childish than children, Frank says. Anger is selfish, funny, always silly and sometimes scary and the song tries to capture that.

Listen to music from Frank Fairfield like Nine Pound Hammer, Fair Margaret and Sweet William & more. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Frank Fairfield. He is Frank Fairfield. We’ve heard him described as someone who was discovered at a farmers market out in California, as if he were some long lost treasure or mythical land.

Tracklist

1 Welcome To Daytrotter 0:09
2 Bo Weevil 3:21
3 Cannonball 3:19
4 Chilly Winds 3:16
5 The Girl I Left Behind 4:18
6 When The Roses Bloom Again 3:11

Companies, etc.

  • Recorded At – Daytrotter Studio

Credits

  • Engineer – Brett Allen, Nick Luca

Notes

Available to stream / download from Daytrotter website

"Frank Fairfield is hard to speak to. He is consumed with a feeling that most of us cannot speak to. We cannot get to it for we can only imagine a very loose-fitting replication of that place where he lives. He lives in Los Angeles, California, sure, but it's full of fakers. It's full of make-believe and of highly-paid professional and amateur actors struggling to figure out what their motivations are in getting to the heart of the character they're trying to play in front of the watchful cameras. Fairfield is not of that part of LA, where Hollywood spoils things into a constructed farce whose goal is to be profitable and quotable first and foremost. This fey man, with a slightly hunched back and a bony handshake, to go with his Dapper Dan pomaded hairstyle, comes from a time that none of the living have ever seen. It exists more than a century again, a time that no person alive today ever saw. The oldest man alive is a young buck in Fairfield's dated and antique gaze. The jackets and trousers that he wears seem to be of the Civil War era and he's not thinking contemporary thoughts. He knows nothing of modern worries. In his head, even though he must know different, coffee costs a quarter and a gallon of milk is a dime. A four-course meal is expensive at $5 and horses and buggies are all the rage. With him, there is no denying that time has stood still for a long, long time. His mind hasn't moved beyond the days when life expectancies were considerably lower and therefore life more tragic and desperate. The hard toil of days, the hard work of getting everything to work for you - love, food on the table, a roof over heads and death not arriving until you were ready - is fastened to Fairfield's very specific sound. His is the sound of a man relying on old practices, of being live in one room with a cheap microphone and the idea that one take will do it. He embodies more the purpose of a recorded piece of music when they were first made - as a chance to hear a performer do exactly what they did live because traveling to everywhere was not an option. His self-titled album from last year is a gritty and rough take on the pride and tiredness of a good and faithful, god-fearing man and the pains of living. These are simple, but unbelievably true to the grain ballads of lesser times, but of more wholesome times, when things were cleaner, harder and in many ways more appealing because of it. Fairfield's voice and his stories of sorrow seem to come from the grave. They seem to bound - actually amble - from the dirt, pulling their legs from the soil and shaking the brown specks of earth out of the cuffs at the bottom of the pant legs. The earthworms have chewed holes through his already spotty stockings and all of the rest of him is decades upon decades past being out of date. He sings about coming home to his woman with $10 in his pocket and having the act be enough to suddenly get her to not call him a dog anymore, but become grateful for the hard week's work and the modest earnings that he makes. It's enough to keep the biscuits in the oven and the eggs in the pantry - not to mention clothes on the kids' backs. Fairfield is such an intriguing writer and performer, one who doesn't take anything of late into account. The newspapers that are printed and thrown onto the stoops every morning must seem so foreign to him, as if they were written by H.G. Wells - the work of a hoax, one of a far-off time that seems implausible, with issues unfathomable. His songs work as easy medicine, a glance into the mind of the long gone past, when most of the country was still wild and rich with unfound gold, majestic scenery in every direction, plentiful and roaming bison herds and with land uncharted to the west. It's a body of work that's intrigued with the thought that we don't have to be of this era. We can live elsewhere, in a time when are great grandparents weren't even a glimmer in their mother or father's eyes."