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Marian Anderson - Marian Anderson At Constitution Hall Washington D.C. Farewell Recital download mp3 album

Marian Anderson - Marian Anderson At Constitution Hall Washington D.C. Farewell Recital download mp3 album
Performer:
Album:
Marian Anderson At Constitution Hall Washington D.C. Farewell Recital
Released:
1965
Country:
Israel
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1626 mb
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1175 mb
WMA vers. size:
1826 mb
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Rating:
4.4 ★
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662

Marian Anderson (February 27, 1897 – April 8, 1993) was an American singer, one of the most celebrated of the twentieth century. Music critic Alan Blyth said: "Her voice was a rich, vibrant contralto of intrinsic beauty. She performed in concert and recital in major music venues and with famous orchestras throughout the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1965. Although offered roles with many important European opera companies, Anderson declined, as she had no training in acting.

b : Feb 27, 1897 in Philadelphia (USA) d : Apr 8, 1993 in Portland (USA) Marian Anderson was a legendary Afro-American classical contralto singer. She opened doors for generations of black American singers. At Constitution Hall Washington . Farewell Recital (Album).

Marian Anderson (February 27, 1897 – April 8, 1993) was an American singer, one of the most celebrated of the twentieth century. She preferred to perform in concert and recital only. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in their Constitution Hall. At the time, Washington, . was a segregated city and black patrons were upset that they had to sit at the back of Constitution Hall. Constitution Hall also did not have the segregated public bathrooms required by DC law at the time for such events. The District of Columbia Board of Education also declined a request to use the auditorium of a white public high school.

Marian Anderson, the renowned singer who touched the conscience of the nation with a 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial after having been refused permission to sing at Constitution Hall because she was black, died yesterday in Portland, Or. a month after suffering a stroke. Her death came at the home of a nephew, Oregon Symphony music director James DePreist, with whom she had lived since 1992. After the DAR's denial of Constitution Hall to Anderson in 1939, attempts were made to reschedule the concert in the auditorium of Washington's Central High School, which was attended by white students. The city's school board feared that would compromise the principles of segregation in the public schools and the efforts collapsed. Central High is now predominantly black Cardozo High School. Then, acting at the request of the NAACP, Harold Ickes, Roosevelt's secretary of the interior, arranged for Anderson to sing outdoors at the Lincoln Memorial. Introducing her, Ickes.

Resource Library Article. Marian Anderson Performs on the National Mall. Listen to the 30-minute concert given by contralto Marian Anderson on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The recital drew a crowd of 75,000 and became a touchstone in the emerging civil rights movement. Anderson, one of the United States' most successful classical singers at the time, had been scheduled to perform at Constitution Hall, a celebrated venue operated by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). However, the DAR refused to allow Anderson, an African-American woman, to perform to an integrated audience. Thousands of members of the DAR resigned in protest, led by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. was a segregated city in 1939. African Americans had separate schools, and facilities at public venues were marked for either "white" or "colored" use. African Americans were forced into inferior seating, in the back of buses and in the back of Constitution Hall. Anderson, her manager, and the local African American community refused to have the concert be segregated.

By many competent authorities Marian Anderson is judged the greatest of all living concert singers. Rising tides of protest from individuals and organizations against the action of the Daughters of the American Revolution in excluding her, on purely racial grounds, from Constitution Hall in Washington, . should be seriously considered by those who have the cause of true Americanism at heart. The question at issue is not the legal matter of whether the . as a private corporation, possess a right before the existing law to practise such an exclusion

Marian Anderson became the first African American to perform with the New York Metropolitan Opera in 1955. She sang at the Lincoln Memorial at the request of Eleanor Roosevelt, and later at JFK's inauguration. Learn more about her life and career at Biography. In 1939 her manager tried to set up a performance for her at Washington, . That was far from the truth. The real reason for turning Anderson away lay in a policy put in place by the . that committed the hall to being a place strictly for white performers

Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 Handel: Ch'io Mai Vi Possa (From "Siroe")
A2 Haydn: The Spirit Song; My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair
A3 Schubert: Suleika Op. 14, No.
A4 Schubert: Liebesbotschaft, Schwanengesang No 1
A5 Schubert: Der Doppelganger, Schwanengesang No. 13
A6 Schubert: Der Erlkonig Op. 1,
B1 Blow, Blow Thou Winter Wind
Arranged By – Roger Quilter
B2 The Plough Boy
Arranged By – Benjamin Britten
B3 Let Us Break Bread Together
Arranged By – William Lawrence
B4 Oh! What A Beautiful City
Arranged By – Edward Boatner
B5 Ride On, King Jesus
Arranged By – Harry T. Burleigh
B6 Done Foun' My Los' Sheep
Arranged By – John Rosamond Johnson
B7 Lord, I Can't Stay Away
Arranged By – Roland Hayes
B8 He's Got The Whole World In His Hands
Arranged By – Hamilton Forrest
B9 Ungeduld From "Die Schone Mullerin" Op. 25, No. 7
Composed By – Franz Schubert

Credits

  • Piano – Franz Rupp

Notes

Farewell recital October 24, 1964. Paul Hume, The Washington Post And Times Herald wrote "Our concert halls will be immeasurably poorer for her departure, but we may hope that our life as a people will continue to be enriched by her undiminished service."

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
LM-2781 Marian Anderson At Constitution Hall Washington D.C. Farewell Recital ‎(LP, Album, Mono) RCA Victor Red Seal LM-2781 Israel 1965
LSC-2781 Marian Anderson Marian Anderson At Constitution Hall Washington D.C. Farewell Recital ‎(LP, Album) RCA Victor Red Seal LSC-2781 US 1965